About

Montse Sunyer. I'm a DIY curator. Here I collect collections of projects by theme..........
Soy curador de DIY (hazlo tú mismo), aquí colecciono proyectos agrupados por temas......................................................................
Je suis conservateur de la DIY thème (Do it yourself). Ici je collectionne les projets regroupés par thème.

Submit a post

Cheshire - Created by Alter Imaging
hace 11 meses
¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!

¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!

(Fuente: assets)

hace 11 meses
¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!

¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!

(Fuente: assets)

hace 1 año
¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!
La nueva dirección:  http://diy-htm.tumblr.com/ 

¡2 cumple Montse Sunyer: Recopilaciones DIY años hoy!

La nueva dirección:  http://diy-htm.tumblr.com/ 

(Fuente: assets)

hace 2 años
Top 10 Anti-heroes Fighting the Superhero Film Monopoly

Top 10 Anti-heroes Fighting the Superhero Film Monopoly

hace 2 años
I love paper Christmas decorations, so when I bumped into The Cheese Thief’s woven paper ball tutorial, I had to give it a try. They’re curiously addicting. Maybe I should carry some supplies with me to pass the time in long check-out lines, boring holiday parties, or during that weird Choreography number in White Christmas. These are made out of paper and one piece of tape. You can cut your own strips (mine are 1/2” wide and 11” long, which yields a ball that’s about 1 1/4” in diameter) or use shiny paper ribbon. Hang them individually or glue them onto a wreath form. I’m stringing mine on baker’s twine to add to the tree. Taping the end of the twine to a toothpick “needle” makes stringing them easier. I plan to space them out along the string, using a dot of hot glue to hold each ball in place where the twine passes through. Get the weaving instructions here!

I love paper Christmas decorations, so when I bumped into The Cheese Thief’s woven paper ball tutorial, I had to give it a try. They’re curiously addicting. Maybe I should carry some supplies with me to pass the time in long check-out lines, boring holiday parties, or during that weird Choreography number in White Christmas.

These are made out of paper and one piece of tape. You can cut your own strips (mine are 1/2” wide and 11” long, which yields a ball that’s about 1 1/4” in diameter) or use shiny paper ribbon.

Hang them individually or glue them onto a wreath form. I’m stringing mine on baker’s twine to add to the tree. Taping the end of the twine to a toothpick “needle” makes stringing them easier. I plan to space them out along the string, using a dot of hot glue to hold each ball in place where the twine passes through. Get the weaving instructions here!

hace 2 años
Somehow my gift wrapping session turned into a snowflake cutting session. I wanted to try making some snowflakes that look a little more 3D than the usual version. These are made with computer paper, a stapler, double-sided tape, and a scissors.If you’ve got standard staples that are 1/2” wide, accordian-fold a sheet of computer paper so that the pleats are 8 1/2” wide by about 3/4”. If you get to the end of the sheet and have a little extra paper left over, trim it off.Staple the folded paper as close to the center of the stack as your stapler will reach. Fold the stack in half at the staple and cut off any excess paper from the long side. The staple should now be in the center.Unless you’re using extra thin paper or you have super-human strength, you won’t be able to cut through all the layers of paper when the stack is folded in half. So unfold the stack and cut a snowflake pattern out of one half, then repeat for the other half, duplicating your design. Pull open the accordian folds and join two adjacent ends with double-sided tape, forming a semicircle. Repeat the process to make the other half of the snowflake decoration, cutting the same design from a second piece of folded paper. Join the two halves together with more tape.Try making smaller snowflakes from a single piece of paper—put the staple closer to one end of the folded stack and cut more off the other end.

Somehow my gift wrapping session turned into a snowflake cutting session. I wanted to try making some snowflakes that look a little more 3D than the usual version. These are made with computer paper, a stapler, double-sided tape, and a scissors.

If you’ve got standard staples that are 1/2” wide, accordian-fold a sheet of computer paper so that the pleats are 8 1/2” wide by about 3/4”. If you get to the end of the sheet and have a little extra paper left over, trim it off.

Staple the folded paper as close to the center of the stack as your stapler will reach. Fold the stack in half at the staple and cut off any excess paper from the long side. The staple should now be in the center.

Unless you’re using extra thin paper or you have super-human strength, you won’t be able to cut through all the layers of paper when the stack is folded in half. So unfold the stack and cut a snowflake pattern out of one half, then repeat for the other half, duplicating your design.

Pull open the accordian folds and join two adjacent ends with double-sided tape, forming a semicircle.

Repeat the process to make the other half of the snowflake decoration, cutting the same design from a second piece of folded paper. Join the two halves together with more tape.

Try making smaller snowflakes from a single piece of paper—put the staple closer to one end of the folded stack and cut more off the other end.

hace 2 años | 2 notas
Blow Up! DIY
In our latest issue of WTVR, we talked to Blow Up! girls Claire and Kristin about tips for throwing the perfect holiday soiree (er, rager). And here, they created a special holiday DIY just for us. Follow these steps to make your own Chilly Geometric Garland. 

Decorate your winter wonderland with 3d geometric paper garland! These little ornament like gems are sure to bring bling to your party.

 You will need:
Ruler
Scissors
Printer
Bone Folder
Hot Glue Gun
at least 4’ of string
crochet needle
x-acto knife



Step one: 
Download our BLOW UP! Geometric shape templates here and print them out!














Step two: Cut out the shapes using the x-acto knife and ruler for crisp edges.



Step three: Score the interior lines of the shape with the bone folder.

Step four: Fold together all your shapes and hot glue them shut.



Step five: Puncture two holes with crochet needle on either side of the shape in their joining points. The triangle gets a bit tricky, so puncture a hole through one of its sides.



Step six:  String the thread through all the shapes. From the center of your string, evenly space your shapes 3” apart from each other. After setting the proper spacing, they should not shift on the string. But if they do, hot glue your sting in the holes to keep them in place. 

Step seven: Cut the string making sure to leave enough room on either side of your shapes for hanging room. 

Step eight: Pop some popcorn, throw on some glitter and sweet tunes because, baby, it’s cold outside…

See more DIYs from Blow Up!

Blow Up! DIY

In our latest issue of WTVR, we talked to Blow Up! girls Claire and Kristin about tips for throwing the perfect holiday soiree (er, rager). And here, they created a special holiday DIY just for us. Follow these steps to make your own Chilly Geometric Garland. 

Decorate your winter wonderland with 3d geometric paper garland! These little ornament like gems are sure to bring bling to your party.
You will need:
Ruler
Scissors
Printer
Bone Folder
Hot Glue Gun
at least 4’ of string
crochet needle
x-acto knife

Step one: 
Download our BLOW UP! Geometric shape templates here and print them out!

Step two: Cut out the shapes using the x-acto knife and ruler for crisp edges.

Step three: Score the interior lines of the shape with the bone folder.
Step four: Fold together all your shapes and hot glue them shut.
Step five: Puncture two holes with crochet needle on either side of the shape in their joining points. The triangle gets a bit tricky, so puncture a hole through one of its sides.
Step six: String the thread through all the shapes. From the center of your string, evenly space your shapes 3” apart from each other. After setting the proper spacing, they should not shift on the string. But if they do, hot glue your sting in the holes to keep them in place. 
Step seven: Cut the string making sure to leave enough room on either side of your shapes for hanging room. 
Step eight: Pop some popcorn, throw on some glitter and sweet tunes because, baby, it’s cold outside…
hace 2 años
The How-To
I’ve seen twine balls used for all sorts of purposes, from chandeliers to pretty table decor, so I thought I’d have a go at making a light garland using this idea. I wanted something that would create a really pretty lighting effect, but I also wanted the string to have quite a strong and vibrant colour.
So I chose to use coloured twine, alternating between pink and purple twine balls. But what I actually found was that the glue and cornflour mixture tended to make the colour look a little dulled and whitewashed, it still looked pretty and works really well if you have more of a muted colour-scheme, however this is not the look I was going for. So to create the vibrancy I wanted I sprayed my twine balls with spraypaint once they had dried, this gave them a really lovely sheen as well as the strong colour I wanted, so this is worth noting if you want strong as opposed to muted colours. And of course if you are spraying yours you can use any twine, you don’t need to go to the expense of sourcing pretty coloured ones.

{You will need}
Twine ~ Either plain or in colours of your choosing
PVA Glue ~ About 1/2 litre
Cornflour
Warm water
Balloons
Marker pen
Vaseline
Old tray for the glue mixture
A broom or long piece of wood to hand the balloons from
Twinkly light garland to attach the twine-balls to
Fishing wire
Spraypaint in the colours of your choice ~ I used Rustoleum painters touch multi-purpose paint 
{One} First of all blow-up the balloons, one for each twine-ball you want to make and draw a circle around the top using your marker so you know where to wrap your twine up to, then smear the balloons with a thin coating of vaseline, this will stop your twine from sticking to the balloons.
{Two} Next I tied a piece of string to the ends of each balloon and then around an old piece of wood which I had balanced across the backs of two chairs in my backyard. This allowed me to work quite easily with the hanging balloons. Make sure you have something underneath, like plastic sheeting or bin bags to catch all the drips.

{Three} Now make your glue mixture, take the old tray (I used a disposable roasting tin so I could just throw it away afterwards) and mix up PVA glue, a few tablespoons of cornstarch and warm water. You want the mixture to be smooth, not too runny, and make sue there’s lots of it as twine is quite absorbent.

{Four} This is the really messy part. Take the twine and dip it into the glue mixture, running it through so it is entirely soaked, then begin wrapping it around the balloon, both vertically and horizontally until you get the desired effect. I wanted mine to have quite a lot of twine so did this a few times. When you have finished snip off the end of the twine and tuck it underneath another piece so it doesn’t stick out. Do the same for all the balloons.

{Five} Leave to dry overnight, you will find that your twine balls have now gone hard, if they haven’t then just leave them a little longer until they are fully set. All the balloons on mine began to pop as they dried, but if they haven’t give them a nudge and pop them then remove the balloons.

{Six} You can now spraypaint the twine balls into your desired colours and attach to your light garland. I used fishing wire which is clear to attach mine. Hang with more fishing wire.




The fabulous photography of the finished garland is courtesy of North West Wedding Photographer Katy Lunsford. All other images taken by me.
The How-To

I’ve seen twine balls used for all sorts of purposes, from chandeliers to pretty table decor, so I thought I’d have a go at making a light garland using this idea. I wanted something that would create a really pretty lighting effect, but I also wanted the string to have quite a strong and vibrant colour.

So I chose to use coloured twine, alternating between pink and purple twine balls. But what I actually found was that the glue and cornflour mixture tended to make the colour look a little dulled and whitewashed, it still looked pretty and works really well if you have more of a muted colour-scheme, however this is not the look I was going for. So to create the vibrancy I wanted I sprayed my twine balls with spraypaint once they had dried, this gave them a really lovely sheen as well as the strong colour I wanted, so this is worth noting if you want strong as opposed to muted colours. And of course if you are spraying yours you can use any twine, you don’t need to go to the expense of sourcing pretty coloured ones.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (6)

{You will need}
  • Twine ~ Either plain or in colours of your choosing
  • PVA Glue ~ About 1/2 litre
  • Cornflour
  • Warm water
  • Balloons
  • Marker pen
  • Vaseline
  • Old tray for the glue mixture
  • A broom or long piece of wood to hand the balloons from
  • Twinkly light garland to attach the twine-balls to
  • Fishing wire
  • Spraypaint in the colours of your choice ~ I used Rustoleum painters touch multi-purpose paint 

{One} First of all blow-up the balloons, one for each twine-ball you want to make and draw a circle around the top using your marker so you know where to wrap your twine up to, then smear the balloons with a thin coating of vaseline, this will stop your twine from sticking to the balloons.

{Two} Next I tied a piece of string to the ends of each balloon and then around an old piece of wood which I had balanced across the backs of two chairs in my backyard. This allowed me to work quite easily with the hanging balloons. Make sure you have something underneath, like plastic sheeting or bin bags to catch all the drips.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (8)

{Three} Now make your glue mixture, take the old tray (I used a disposable roasting tin so I could just throw it away afterwards) and mix up PVA glue, a few tablespoons of cornstarch and warm water. You want the mixture to be smooth, not too runny, and make sue there’s lots of it as twine is quite absorbent.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (9)

{Four} This is the really messy part. Take the twine and dip it into the glue mixture, running it through so it is entirely soaked, then begin wrapping it around the balloon, both vertically and horizontally until you get the desired effect. I wanted mine to have quite a lot of twine so did this a few times. When you have finished snip off the end of the twine and tuck it underneath another piece so it doesn’t stick out. Do the same for all the balloons.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (10)

{Five} Leave to dry overnight, you will find that your twine balls have now gone hard, if they haven’t then just leave them a little longer until they are fully set. All the balloons on mine began to pop as they dried, but if they haven’t give them a nudge and pop them then remove the balloons.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (11)

{Six} You can now spraypaint the twine balls into your desired colours and attach to your light garland. I used fishing wire which is clear to attach mine. Hang with more fishing wire.

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (2)

Craft, DIY, Featured on Rock n Roll Bride, How-To, Light Garland, North West Wedding Planner, Party Decor, Pocketful of Dreams, Tutorial, Twine Ball, Wedding Craft Project, Wedding Decor, Wedding DIY, Wedding Stylist Michelle Kelly (3)

The fabulous photography of the finished garland is courtesy of North West Wedding Photographer Katy Lunsford. All other images taken by me.

hace 2 años | 1 nota
Keep reading for the easy instructions!

Materials Needed: tissue paper scissors, glue gun or double-sided tape, ruler, string, cardboard, x-acto knife
Step 1. Cut cardboard in equilateral triangles (same length on each side). The ones shown here are 16cm on each side.
Step 2: Glue the triangle to the tissue paper leaving about 3 1/2″ of extra tissue for the fringe.

Step 3: Do the same to the other side of the cardboard.
Step 4: Cut around the triangle leaving 3 1/2″ all the way around. For the corners cut a wedge so that the paper will fall down flat on each side.
Step 5: Create a crease in the tissue so the fringe lays flat.

Step 6: With the x-acto knife, cut a whole in the triangle in one corner.
Step 7: From the corner draw an imaginary line to the center of the opposite side and create another hole.
Step 8: Cut two strings of equal length. Give yourself enough room depending on where you want to place it.
Step 9: Create a knot large enough so the end won’t slip through the holes then slide them through.

Step 10: Now, measure the length of the string according to where you want to place the next triangle. I measured the spacing at 15cm, slightly smaller than the size of the triangle. Double knot it.
Step 11: Slide the next triangle onto the string but make sure you alternate stringing from the corner and flat edge of the cut holes.
Step 12: String all the triangles on until you’ve reached your desired height.


The beauty of these is that they can be used for any occasion. Do red/green for Christmas, red/pink for Valentine’s, shades of green for St. Pattty’s, or use a child’s favorite colors for a birthday. Enjoy!
photos by Hilda Grahnat

Keep reading for the easy instructions!

Materials Needed: tissue paper scissors, glue gun or double-sided tape, ruler, string, cardboard, x-acto knife

Step 1. Cut cardboard in equilateral triangles (same length on each side). The ones shown here are 16cm on each side.

Step 2: Glue the triangle to the tissue paper leaving about 3 1/2″ of extra tissue for the fringe.

Step 3: Do the same to the other side of the cardboard.

Step 4: Cut around the triangle leaving 3 1/2″ all the way around. For the corners cut a wedge so that the paper will fall down flat on each side.

Step 5: Create a crease in the tissue so the fringe lays flat.

Step 6: With the x-acto knife, cut a whole in the triangle in one corner.

Step 7: From the corner draw an imaginary line to the center of the opposite side and create another hole.

Step 8: Cut two strings of equal length. Give yourself enough room depending on where you want to place it.

Step 9: Create a knot large enough so the end won’t slip through the holes then slide them through.

Step 10: Now, measure the length of the string according to where you want to place the next triangle. I measured the spacing at 15cm, slightly smaller than the size of the triangle. Double knot it.

Step 11: Slide the next triangle onto the string but make sure you alternate stringing from the corner and flat edge of the cut holes.

Step 12: String all the triangles on until you’ve reached your desired height.

The beauty of these is that they can be used for any occasion. Do red/green for Christmas, red/pink for Valentine’s, shades of green for St. Pattty’s, or use a child’s favorite colors for a birthday. Enjoy!

photos by Hilda Grahnat

hace 2 años
Materials: 
 Five spools of two inch ribbon, hot glue, scissors, and an embroidery hoop.


Directions:
Step One. Cut each of your spools in half resulting in two, 6-ft. strands of ribbon strands in each color.
Step Two. Going around the embroidery hoop, begin gluing the backside of one end of the ribbon onto the hoop, leaving an open slot between strands. 
Step Three. Once the strands have been glued, begin looping them across and over the opposite side. 
Step Four. Using hot glue, secure the underside of the ribbon into place.  Continue around the circle until each length of ribbon has been looped; you’ll have an orbit-like structure.
Step Five. Hang with fishing line for an eye-catching and affordable centerpiece! (Check with your venue to ensure you can install hanging centerpieces).

Materials:

 Five spools of two inch ribbon, hot glue, scissors, and an embroidery hoop.

Directions:

Step One. Cut each of your spools in half resulting in two, 6-ft. strands of ribbon strands in each color.

Step Two. Going around the embroidery hoop, begin gluing the backside of one end of the ribbon onto the hoop, leaving an open slot between strands. 

Step Three. Once the strands have been glued, begin looping them across and over the opposite side. 

Step Four. Using hot glue, secure the underside of the ribbon into place.  Continue around the circle until each length of ribbon has been looped; you’ll have an orbit-like structure.

Step Five. Hang with fishing line for an eye-catching and affordable centerpiece! (Check with your venue to ensure you can install hanging centerpieces).

hace 2 años

Supplies Needed
colored cardstock
cutting mat
exacto knife
ruler
pencil
glue
needle and thread
wooden dowels (use kabob sticks!)
Steps to awesome
Cut very thin strips of the cardstock using the exacto knife and ruler. Thinner than 1/4″ is best. Watch those fingers!
Curl the strips around a pencil to create a curly Q. Make some tighter and some looser. Variety always wins.
Thread a bunch of Qs to make the garland OR glue a few onto a wooden dowel to make a drink stirrer. Get crazy and stick some finished dowels into a cake or a few cupcakes. That would be super cute.

Throw a party to show off your Curly Q skills!

Photography: Amber Marlow.

Supplies Needed

  • colored cardstock
  • cutting mat
  • exacto knife
  • ruler
  • pencil
  • glue
  • needle and thread
  • wooden dowels (use kabob sticks!)
Steps to awesome
  1. Cut very thin strips of the cardstock using the exacto knife and ruler. Thinner than 1/4″ is best. Watch those fingers!
  2. Curl the strips around a pencil to create a curly Q. Make some tighter and some looser. Variety always wins.
  3. Thread a bunch of Qs to make the garland OR glue a few onto a wooden dowel to make a drink stirrer. Get crazy and stick some finished dowels into a cake or a few cupcakes. That would be super cute.

Throw a party to show off your Curly Q skills!

Photography: Amber Marlow.

hace 2 años | 1 nota

You’ll need:
4 yards of 0.5mm chinese knotting cord
a connector or charm
an embroidery needle
a pair of scissors
flat nose pliers (optional)
a lighter (optional)






Start by cutting the knotting cord into two 30 inch, two 20 inch and one 10 inch lengths.  Fold the 20 inch piece in half, pull the loop through the ring, fold it over the ring, and pull the rest of the cord through the loop. Repeat the step on the other side of the ring. These strands will be anchored and remain stationary.



Center the 30 inch cord under the two middle strands. Fold the right cord over the middle strands and under the left cord. Pull the left cord under the right and middle strands and through the loop on the right side.



Pull tightly and slide the knot up to the top.



Finish the 2nd half of the square knot by folding the left cord over the middle strands and under the right cord. Pull the right cord under the left and middle strands and through the loop on the left side.



Pull tightly and repeat the steps – left, right, left, right … Continue knotting until the desired length is reached. Keep in mind that the clasp will take up approximately half an inch.



To finish the knots, thread one of the cords onto a needle and sew up the center of 3-4 knots along the backside. Pliers will help pull the needle through the tight knots.



Repeat the same step on the other cord.



After sewing up both knotting cords, trim away any excess. Save the scraps and melt the tips with a lighter to seal it for extra hold. Repeat the same exact step on the second half of the bracelet.



To make a sliding closure, shape the bracelet into a circle and overlap the middle strands. Use scraps to temporarily tie the cords together at each end.



Take the 10 inch cord and center it under the strands. Start tying square knots exactly the same way the bracelet was executed.



Stop at about half an inch and sew the knotting cords into the backside of the closure. Remove the temporary ties.



The two sets of middle strands are now the adjustable ties of the bracelet. Adjust to fit the wrist and tie each end into knots. Trim away any excess.



Your adjustable knotted bracelets are finished!! xx


(HonestlyWTF DIY bracelets & Tai pink crystal bracelet; Mr. Kate & Catbird rings; all images by HonestlyWTF

You’ll need:

Start by cutting the knotting cord into two 30 inch, two 20 inch and one 10 inch lengths.  Fold the 20 inch piece in half, pull the loop through the ring, fold it over the ring, and pull the rest of the cord through the loop. Repeat the step on the other side of the ring. These strands will be anchored and remain stationary.

Center the 30 inch cord under the two middle strands. Fold the right cord over the middle strands and under the left cord. Pull the left cord under the right and middle strands and through the loop on the right side.

Pull tightly and slide the knot up to the top.

Finish the 2nd half of the square knot by folding the left cord over the middle strands and under the right cord. Pull the right cord under the left and middle strands and through the loop on the left side.

Pull tightly and repeat the steps – left, right, left, right … Continue knotting until the desired length is reached. Keep in mind that the clasp will take up approximately half an inch.

To finish the knots, thread one of the cords onto a needle and sew up the center of 3-4 knots along the backside. Pliers will help pull the needle through the tight knots.

Repeat the same step on the other cord.

After sewing up both knotting cords, trim away any excess. Save the scraps and melt the tips with a lighter to seal it for extra hold. Repeat the same exact step on the second half of the bracelet.

To make a sliding closure, shape the bracelet into a circle and overlap the middle strands. Use scraps to temporarily tie the cords together at each end.

Take the 10 inch cord and center it under the strands. Start tying square knots exactly the same way the bracelet was executed.

Stop at about half an inch and sew the knotting cords into the backside of the closure. Remove the temporary ties.

The two sets of middle strands are now the adjustable ties of the bracelet. Adjust to fit the wrist and tie each end into knots. Trim away any excess.

Your adjustable knotted bracelets are finished!! xx

(HonestlyWTF DIY bracelets & Tai pink crystal bracelet; Mr. Kate & Catbird rings; all images by HonestlyWTF

hace 2 años | 4 notas

You’ll need:

embroidery thread
a safety pin or tape
a pair of scissors

Start by cutting several strands of embroidery thread at about 24 inches each. Make sure there are two sets of each color. Combine the threads and tie a knot, leaving at least 3 inches of slack. Tape it to a flat surface or safety pin it to a pillow. Separate the two sets, arranging the strands in a mirror-image pattern with the outside strands the same color and so on moving inwards.

Start on the left side with the outermost color (shown here in red) and make a forward knot by creating a 4-shape over the 2nd color, loop it under and back through the opening.

Pull up and to the right to tighten. Make the same knot twice over each color. Continue knotting over each color, towards the right, until the outermost color has carried over to the middle. This is one half of the chevron pattern.

Now pick up the outermost color on the right side (show here in red) and make a backward knot, creating a reverse 4-shape over the 2nd color, loop it under and back through the opening. Pull up and to the left to tighten. Don’t forget to knot twice over each color!

Continue knotting towards the left until the outermost strand reaches the middle. Tie a backwards knot with the two middle strands to connect the two halves. Did you remember to knot twice? The first chevron row is complete! Continue with the the next color, which is now the outermost strand …

Remembering the color order is important for the first few rows but after the 3rd or 4th row, the strands will fall nicely in place. Finish it with a knot and a braid.

For a striped bracelet, cut one set of colors and simply carry the outermost color all the way through to the right side. For an assymetrical chevron, mix the colors when dividing them into 2 sets. Be sure to count the number of strands so you know when to stop in the middle each time. For an embellished bracelet, take a small piece of rhinestone chain, glue it to the top of the bracelet and stitch embroidery thread between each rhinestone with an embroidery needle.

A wrist full of HonestlyWTF DIYs to keep you busy all summer long!
  • You’ll need:

  • embroidery thread
  • a safety pin or tape
  • a pair of scissors

Start by cutting several strands of embroidery thread at about 24 inches each. Make sure there are two sets of each color. Combine the threads and tie a knot, leaving at least 3 inches of slack. Tape it to a flat surface or safety pin it to a pillow. Separate the two sets, arranging the strands in a mirror-image pattern with the outside strands the same color and so on moving inwards.

Start on the left side with the outermost color (shown here in red) and make a forward knot by creating a 4-shape over the 2nd color, loop it under and back through the opening.

Pull up and to the right to tighten. Make the same knot twice over each color. Continue knotting over each color, towards the right, until the outermost color has carried over to the middle. This is one half of the chevron pattern.

Now pick up the outermost color on the right side (show here in red) and make a backward knot, creating a reverse 4-shape over the 2nd color, loop it under and back through the opening. Pull up and to the left to tighten. Don’t forget to knot twice over each color!

Continue knotting towards the left until the outermost strand reaches the middle. Tie a backwards knot with the two middle strands to connect the two halves. Did you remember to knot twice? The first chevron row is complete! Continue with the the next color, which is now the outermost strand …

Remembering the color order is important for the first few rows but after the 3rd or 4th row, the strands will fall nicely in place. Finish it with a knot and a braid.

For a striped bracelet, cut one set of colors and simply carry the outermost color all the way through to the right side. For an assymetrical chevron, mix the colors when dividing them into 2 sets. Be sure to count the number of strands so you know when to stop in the middle each time. For an embellished bracelet, take a small piece of rhinestone chain, glue it to the top of the bracelet and stitch embroidery thread between each rhinestone with an embroidery needle.

A wrist full of HonestlyWTF DIYs to keep you busy all summer long!